Kimber Book Review from @kleffnotes

Set in the year 2209, Kimber is the story of a world that has had to completely change after the Earth’s ozone layer has been ravaged by a solar storm. The entire population was reduced to just 200 people who were able to hide from the radiation that brought a global extinction. Those who have survived will have to find a way to change in order to continue to live in a completely changed world.

The cave that provided refuge to those who survived has now been named Inanna and it contains the last hope for humanity. Those who designed the city within the cave know that humans on their own will not be able to survive, but they can be altered in order to live. They have been told by the government to ensure survival no matter what they must do. What happens from their is a plan to graft human beings with the skin of the most radiation resistant animal species. As their work continues a new type of people emerges. Kimber is one of the 23 who have been termed a subspecies of humans known as Auroras. They are growing up in a city that leads them questioning whether they are truly part of the Inannian citizenry or if they are merely serving them.

Previous reviews of this book have recommended that readers who enjoyed The Hunger Games or The Maze Runner series will love L.K. Hingey’s planned trilogy. I have to agree. This book places readers in a well established futuristic world and pushes them to imagine being born and changed for the sake of the survival of others. The Auroras get their name from the beautiful lights that can be seen in the sky, but the plans that have been made for them are truly dark. I am curious to see how this story evolves in the coming books. This is the perfect read for transporting you to a new and distant world that will keep you turning pages until the very end. You can find out more about Kimber on L.K. Hingey’s website.

Share your thoughts with us in the comments or on Twitter, @thenerdygirlexp. You can find me on Twitter, @kleffnotes, on my blog, kleffnotes.wordpress.com, and on my kleffnotes YouTube channel.

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